Making Learning Visible

As part of our District’s Innovative Learning Design Project (Phase 2), we have a number of teachers involved in collaborative inquiry.  There are 9 classroom teachers, 1 LST teacher, the Teacher Librarian and the administration involved in the project.  There are teachers are working in groups of 2 or 3 on a particular inquiry question of interest.  We will share these questions at another time.

Our school, over-arching question is:

How can we make learning more visible?

At our school-wide Welcome Assembly last week, our principal, Carrie Burton, talked about Making Learning Visible.  She made everyone aware of what learning looks like when she demonstrated her own learning.

Take a look at the video below to see what learning looks like.

How are you making learning visible this year?

About Tia M. Dawson

There are many things that define who I am as a person. First of all, I am a mother of 3 wonderful children! I can not express how fortunate we are to have our children in our life! Secondly, I am an elementary educator who recently returned to the classroom after 12+ years as an elementary school administrator. Lastly, I am passionate about helping others, learning about abuse, helping others in abusive relationships, and helping others understand their worth.
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10 Responses to Making Learning Visible

  1. Ramin Mehrassa says:

    Thanks for this post Tia. I’m a newish VP at an elementary school in Maple Ridge and am already thinking of how I could incorporate something like this at our school. It’s posts like this that makes me think I too can become an instructional leader and not just a manager:)

    • T. Henriksen says:

      Hi Ramin,
      Definitely, work towards being an instructional leader, learner, mentor, and not just a manager. If that was all our VP job consisted of, my, it sure wouldn’t be that rewarding. I love my job because of the difference I can make and the influence (even if it is small) I can have. The best thing a teacher said to me at the end of last year was, “Thanks, Tia. You have such a great quiet leadership about you. You gave me my wings and let me fly.” What a compliment! Isn’t that what we want?

      Good luck and keep in touch!
      Tia

  2. Fantastic video, Tia! We are so fortunate to have you and Carrie as our admin team. You not only talk the talk, but you walk the walk too. Thanks for being so willing to share your learning. You make all of us aspire to be better each day!

    • T. Henriksen says:

      Oh, Diana,

      That is so sweet of you to say. Truth is, you all make it easy for us! It is great to work with wonderful, dedicated staff, who truly have a heart for kids and who keep our students at the centre – always.

      You all make us want to try new things. You all make us feel safe enough to take risks. Isn’t that what it is all about?

      Tia
      🙂

  3. Hi Tia,
    I loved watching this video. Isn’t it great that kids can see adults as risk-takers and continuous learners too?

    • T. Henriksen says:

      Hi Tammy,

      Yes, it is so very important that we all model our learning. We need to be risk-takers if we want our students to take risks in their own learning.

      Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment.

      Tia

  4. Pingback: Making Learning Visible | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it

  5. Fran says:

    Thanks for this post. I’ve just finished Visible Learning and have been looking for teachers/schools who are reading this. I especially value the work on self-regulation, teachers learners how to learn.

  6. Pingback: Making Learning Visible | Metacognition | Scoop.it

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